Another classic in internet culture, the video titled “Charlie Bit My Finger”, showing the interaction between two little English brothers in 2007, was sold for a six-digit sum at a new “NFT” digital works auction.

The video was sold for $ 760,000 on Sunday, 14 years after its successful appearance on the web.

The video shows British baby Charlie biting his brother Harry’s finger, sitting on his lap, and then laughing out loud.

“Ouch, Charlie,” Harry says and then exclaims a phrase that has become iconic: “Charlie, that hurt.”

With more than 883 million views, it is one of the most popular videos on YouTube, although it will soon leave the platform.

The Davies-Carr family announced that it will remove it after the sale and said that the buyer will become “the sole owner of this loving piece of internet history” although, obviously, it has already been copied and shared multiple times around the world.

The piece attracted users from 11 accounts to the auction and sparked a bidding war between users “mememaster” and “3fmusic,” the latter of which ultimately won by offering $ 760,999.

NFTs (non-fungible tokens) are backed and certified virtual objects whose popularity exploded in the last year.

Although buying something infinitely reproducible can be confusing for some, NFTs created a frenzied appetite in markets around the world with buyers wanting to flaunt a certificate of originality.

The most attractive are so called ‘old pieces of the internet’, including memes, GIFs, photos and videos.

In March, Twitter boss Jack Dorsey sold his first tweet, which simply says “just setting up my twttr” for $ 2.9 million to a Malaysian businessman.

In February, an anonymous buyer paid $590,000 for the Nyan Cat animation.

And last month “Disaster Girl,” a 16-year-old photo of a little girl smiling with a burning house in the background, was bought by a Dubai music studio for 180 ethereum, worth $500,000.

Source: Fintechs.fi